GMAT


ABOUT GMAT

 

The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT  is a computer adaptive test (CAT) intended to assess certain analytical, writing, quantitative, verbal, and reading skills in written English for use in admission to a graduate management program, such as an MBA. It requires knowledge of certain grammar and knowledge of certain algebra, geometry, and arithmetic. The GMAT does not measure business knowledge or skill, nor does it measure intelligence. According to the test owning company, the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC), the GMAT assesses analytical writing and problem-solving abilities, while also addressing data sufficiency, logic, and critical reasoning skills that it believes to be vital to real-world business and management success. It can be taken up to five times a year. Each attempt must be at least 16 days apart.

 

GMAT is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council. More than 5,900 programs offered by more than 2,100 universities and institutions use the GMAT exam as part of the selection criteria for their programs. Business schools use the test as a criterion for admission into a wide range of graduate management programs, including MBA, Master of Accountancy, and Master of Finance programs. The GMAT exam is administered in standardized test centers in 112 countries around the world. According to a survey conducted by Kaplan Test Prep, the GMAT is still the number one choice for MBA aspirants despite the increasing acceptability of GRE scores. According to GMAC, it has continually performed validity studies to statistically verify that the exam predicts success in business school programs.

Format and Timing

 The GMAT exam consists of four sections: an analytical writing assessment, an integrated reasoning section, a quantitative section, and a verbal section. Total testing time is three and a half hours, but test takers should plan for a total time of approximately four hours, with breaks. Test takers have 30 minutes for the analytical writing assessment and another 30 minutes to work through 12 questions, which often have multiple parts, on the integrated reasoning section and are given 75 minutes to work through 37 questions in the quantitative section and another 75 minutes to get through 41 questions in the verbal section.

Section Duration in minutes Number of questions
Analytical writing assessment 30 1 essay
Integrated reasoning 30 12
Quantitative 75 37
Verbal 75 41

 

The quantitative and verbal sections of the GMAT exam are both multiple-choice and are administered in the computer-adaptive format, adjusting to a test taker’s level of ability. At the start of the quantitative and verbal sections, test takers are presented with a question of average difficulty. As questions are answered correctly, the computer presents the test taker with increasingly difficult questions and as questions are answered incorrectly the computer presents the test taker with questions of decreasing difficulty. This process continues until test takers complete each section, at which point the computer will have an accurate assessment of their ability level in that subject area and come up with a raw score for each section.

On July 11th, 2017, the GMAC announced that from now on the order in which the different parts of the GMAT are taken can be chosen at the beginning of the exam.

Three options will be available at the test center:

Analytical Writing Assessment, Integrated Reasoning, Quantitative, Verbal (original order)

Verbal, Quantitative, Integrated Reasoning, Analytical Writing Assessment

Quantitative, Verbal, Integrated Reasoning, Analytical Writing Assessment

There is no “correct” or “recommended” section order to select. This choice simply gives you more control and flexibility to take the GMAT exam based on your strengths and testing preference

 

GMAT Test Section # of Questions Question Types Timing
Analytical Writing Assessment 1 Topic Analysis of Argument 30 Minutes
Integrated Reasoning 12 Questions Multi-Source Reasoning

Graphics Interpretation

Two-Part Analysis

Table Analysis

30 Minutes
Quantitative 37 Questions Data Sufficiency

Problem Solving

75 Minutes
Verbal 41 Questions Reading Comprehension

Critical Reasoning

Sentence Correction

75 Minutes
Total Exam Time 3hrs, 30 minutes

About Integrated Reasoning India

 Managers need to analyze multiple streams of data in our data-driven world. The Integrated Reasoning section of the GMAT exam shines a spotlight on the skills that matter most to today’s employers.

 Integrated Reasoning Skills Are Important to Global Employers

Findings from GMAC’s 2012 Corporate Recruiters Survey of 636 global employers who plan to hire new MBAs and other master’s business degree graduates reveal large majorities find the four specific Integrated Reasoning skills that the GMAT exam will measure as “very important,” and almost all find them very or somewhat important for new business degree hires to have.

Today’s managers are called upon to analyze more and more sophisticated streams of data, and management programs are responding by preparing their students to solve more complex problems. The skills being tested in the 30-minute Integrated Reasoning section of the GMAT exam were identified as important for incoming students to have a 2009 survey of 740 management faculty worldwide.

What Schools Are Saying About Integrated Reasoning “This has been called the era of big data, and it is increasingly evident that the future will be claimed by those able to see the critical patterns among overwhelming complexity,” said Christine Poon, dean of The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business and former vice chairman of Johnson & Johnson’s board of directors and worldwide chairman of the Pharmaceuticals Group. “It is no surprise that GMAT would be the test to respond to the need of business schools and management programs to identify students with these skills. They have been the gold standard for as long as I can remember, and they continue to innovate and reset the bar for everyone else.”

ABOUT GMAT SCORES:

Total, Verbal, and Quantitative Scores

Total GMAT scores range from 200 to 800; two-thirds of test takers score between 400 and 600.

Verbal and Quantitative scores range from 0 to 60; scores below 9 and above 44 for the Verbal section and below 7 and above 50 for the Quantitative section are rare.

Verbal and Quantitative scores are on a fixed scale and can be compared across all GMAT test administrations, but because they measure different constructs, they cannot be compared to each other.

If you do not finish in the allotted time, your scores will be calculated based upon the number of questions answered as long as you worked on each section. Your score will decrease significantly with each unanswered question.

About Analytical Writing Assessment Score

The Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA) score is based on one Analysis of an Argument essay. Essays are scored independently twice and then averaged. Scores for the AWA range from 0 to 6 in half-point intervals.

Each essay receives two independent ratings, one of which may be performed by an automated essay-scoring engine, which evaluates more than 50 structural and linguistic features.

If the two ratings differ by more than one point, an expert reader provides a third evaluation to determine the final score.

Expert readers are trained college and university faculty members who consider the following:

The overall quality of your ideas about the argument presented.  Your overall ability to organize, develops, and express those ideas.

The relevant supporting reasons and examples you used

Your ability to control the elements of standard written English

Readers are trained to be sensitive and fair in evaluating the responses of examinees whose first language is not English.

If you believe that your AWA score is not accurate, you may request that your essay be rescored using the Essay Rescore Request Form.

About Integrated Reasoning Score

Integrated Reasoning (IR) scores range from 1 to 8 in single-digit intervals; no partial credit is given.

Most Integrated Reasoning questions require more than one response. Because the questions are designed to measure how well you integrate data to solve complex problems, you must answer all responses to a question correctly to receive credit

 

TEST FEES.

 GMAT TEST FEE $ 250

Additional Score report $28

Register for GMAT http://www.mba.com/india/the-gmat-exam/register.aspx?__hstc=81503688.5bed18c3da50432c5971c141e94f0477.1500445918943.1500445918943.1500722591680.2&__hssc=81503688.1.1500722591680&__hsfp=222235934

 

 

Courtesy: GMAC.ORG and MBA.COM