GRE


About the GRE® test
GRE® test stands for GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATIONS®. There are two types of GRE® tests: (1) GRE® General test, and (2) GRE® Subject test

The Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) is a standardized test that is an admissions requirement for most Graduate Schools in the United States.The GRE is owned and administered by Educational Testing Service (ETS) who created it in 1949. According to ETS, the GRE aims to measure verbal reasoning, quantitative reasoning, analytical writing, and critical thinking skills that have been acquired over a long period of learning. The content of the GRE consists of certain specific algebra, geometry, arithmetic, and vocabulary. The GRE General Test is offered as a computer-based exam administered at Prometric testing centers.

In the graduate school admissions process, the level of emphasis that is placed upon GRE scores varies widely between schools and between departments within schools. The importance of a GRE score can range from being a mere admission formality to an important selection factor.

The GRE was significantly overhauled in August 2011, resulting in an exam that is not adaptive on a question-by-question basis, but rather by section, so that the performance on the first verbal and math sections determine the difficulty of the second sections presented. Overall, the test retained the sections and many of the question types from its predecessor, but the scoring scale was changed to a 130 to 170 scale (from a 200 to 800 scale).

The cost to take the test is US$205, although ETS will reduce the fee under certain circumstances.They also promote financial aid to those GRE applicants who prove economic hardship. ETS does not release scores that are older than 5 years, although graduate program policies on the acceptance of scores older than 5 years will vary.  https://www.ets.org/gre/revised_general/about/content/computer

The overall testing time for the computer-delivered GRE® General Test is about three hours and 45 minutes. There are six sections with a 10-minute break following the third section.

Structure of the Computer-delivered Test

Measure Number of Questions Allotted Time
Analytical Writing

(One section with two separately timed tasks)

One “Analyze an Issue” task and one “Analyze an Argument” task 30 minutes per task
Verbal Reasoning

(Two sections)

20 questions per section 30 minutes per section
Quantitative Reasoning

(Two sections)

20 questions per section 35 minutes per section
Unscored¹ Varies Varies
Research² Varies Varies

1 An unidentified unscored section that does not count toward your score may be included and may appear in any order after the Analytical Writing section. Questions in the unscored section are being tried out either for possible use in future tests or to ensure that scores on new editions of the test are comparable to scores from earlier editions.

2 An identified research section that does not count toward your score may be included in place of the unscored section. The research section will always appear at the end of the test. Questions in this section are included for ETS research purposes.

The Analytical Writing section will always be first. The Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning, and unidentified/unscored sections may appear in any order; therefore, you should treat each section as if it counts toward your score

To know more about test centers and how to book the GRE slots, please check the below link https://ereg.ets.org/ereg/public/workflowmanager/workflow?workflowItemId=tcAvailability

Scores

For individuals testing on or after July 1, 2016, GRE® test scores are valid for five years after your test administration date. For example, scores for a test taken on July 3, 2016, are reportable through July 2, 2021.

For individuals who tested between August 1, 2011, and June 30, 2016, GRE test scores are valid for five years after the testing year in which you tested (as indicated in the GRE® Information Bulletin from that testing year). For example, scores for a test taken on May 15, 2015, are reportable through June 30, 2020.

GRE scores earned in August 2011 are reportable until June 30, 2017

Scores Reported on the GRE® General Test

Section Score Scale
Verbal Reasoning 130–170, in 1 point increments
Quantitative Reasoning 130–170, in 1 point increments
Analytical Writing 0–6, in half point increments

If no questions are answered for a specific measure (e.g., Verbal Reasoning), then you will receive a No Score (NS) for that measure

Courtesy: https://www.ets.org/gre/revised_general/scores/

Ordering Additional Score Reports (ASRs)

There are three ways to order Additional Score Reports (ASRs): online, by mail and by fax. If scores for the test administration have been reported, scores will be reported within five to 10 business days after receipt of your request. If scores for the test administration have not been reported, your scores will be reported on or after the published score reporting date.

You can select to send from your Most Recent, All or Any specific test administration of the GRE® General Test and/or Subject Tests. ASRs can be ordered for a fee of US$27 per score recipient. See below for information on the score reporting options available for each ordering method.

Once a request is submitted, it cannot be canceled, changed or refunded.

Ordering ASRs Online

  • Additional score reports can be ordered online in your ETS Account.
  • Score reports will be sent to your designated institutions approximately five business days after your order is placed.

 

SUBJECT GRE

GRE 2017 Subject Test – GRE test pattern 2017

Biochemistry, Cell and Molecular Biology Test: This GRE Subject test is no longer available. Biochemistry, Cell and Molecular Biology test has been discontinued since December 2016. For candidates who have taken this test in 2015-2016, the scores of this test can be reported for the next five years.  

Biology Test: This test consists of 194 five-choice questions, based on descriptions of laboratory and field situations, diagrams or experimental results. The content is organized into three areas: cellular and molecular biology, organismal biology and ecology and evolution. Equal weight is given to each of these three areas. In addition to the total score, a SubScore in each of these subfield areas is reported.

Chemistry Test: The test consists of 130 multiple-choice questions. A periodic table is printed in the test booklet as well as a table of information presenting various physical constants and a few conversion factors among SI units.

Literature in English Test: This test consists of 230 questions on poetry, drama, biography, the essay, the short story, the novel, criticism, literary theory and the history of the language. Some questions are based on short works reprinted in their entirety, others on excerpts from longer works. The test draws on literature in English from the British Isles, the United States and other parts of the world.

Mathematics Test: As per the GRE test pattern 2017, this test consists of 66 multiple-choice questions drawn from courses commonly offered at the undergraduate level. Approximately 50% of the questions involve calculus and its applications. About 25% of the questions in the test are in elementary algebra, linear algebra, abstract.

Physics Test: This test consists of 100 five-choice questions, based on diagrams, graphs, experimental data and descriptions of physical situations. The aim of the test is to determine the extent of the examinees’ grasp of fundamental principles and their ability to apply these principles to solve problems.

Psychology Test: The test consists of approximately 205 multiple-choice questions as per the GRE test pattern 2017. Each question has five options from which the examinee has to select the correct option or best answer. Stimulus materials, such as a description of an experiment or a graph, may serve as the basis for several questions

Courtesy: https://www.ets.org/gre/revised_general/scores/